PiWars, Ada Awards and Text Adventures

Once again, it’s been a busy few months both at work and outside of work. Sometimes I take a look at the last 12 months and wonder how so much could’ve happened in such a short amount of time. This time last year, I was excited about travelling to Glasgow and Belfast, now I’ve been to the US three times and to Argentina and Brazil, with the next Brazil trip all set for next month. It’s funny how quickly things can change.

So, what have I been up to? As simple as it may sound, one of the most exciting things I’ve been doing over the last few months has been working with some of my pi-top colleagues to build a robot to take part in PiWars. Last year, I attended the event as a judge and was struck by how much of a wonderful community event it was and how it really brought out the best of the pi community and so this year I was determined to get involved myself and was surprised to find that some of the guys here were equally keen to get involved. After several meetings, our team is still 8 people strong and we’re really exciting about building our robot (once we finally decide on the design).

Take a look at our first blog post about the members of our team here on the pi-top website. Sometimes I’m reminded that I work with a really great bunch of people!

In the middle of November, I received notification that I’d been shortlisted for European Digital Woman of the year at the Ada Awards. While I didn’t win the award, it was a great honour to have been shortlisted and they made it clear that they had received a lot of entries from women across the EU, so to be in the final three was an incredible achievement, especially as I got to fly to Brussels and spend the day with some of the young nominees, including Aoibheann Mangan, daughter of Iseult Mangan (also an incredible maker and educator) and Helena Staple, daughter of roboteer Danny Staple. Both young ladies (and their parents) made my trip to Brussels really exciting and I loved spending time with them (and eating far too much chocolate with them)!

Finally, as part of my outreach work for Crossover Solutions, I’ve been working for a half day every two weeks in a school in Wandsworth where I’ve been looking at Text Adventures with the Year 6 pupils. You may remember that I first looked at Active Lit way back in 2014 and I’m still a big fan because, while it doesn’t necessarily teach a specific coding language, it really does teach some computational thinking skills. It’s really difficult for students to understand the level of decomposition needed to create a single room in a text game – they have to think about each individual item of the room as an object and then decide whether it is an object that can be opened, taken, hidden etc. I made a couple of presentations to go with the lessons this time which can be found here and here, as well as a worksheet to help define items in the first room. It’s still a very tough interface to explain to children and I found myself running around a lot to help support them – I’d love to hear about how other teachers have gotten on with using it as I really feel as though there is a lot of scope to teach some transferable skills here and the students really enjoy working through and creating their own text adventures.

Anyway, that’s it for my brief update – expect more soon!

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PyConUK 2017

Gosh, I’ve been a little bit busy lately. I feel sad because it means my digital making has fallen by the wayside a little, but I guess we have to accept that sometimes life gets in the way.

I can’t believe that it’s November tomorrow – I’m currently in Lincoln visiting my niece for her 8th birthday (of course, I got her something relating to digital making from Pimoroni – a very cool Chibitronics kit that already got opened and tested before breakfast – Expect a review soon).

I’m also just recovering from four amazing days in Cardiff for PyConUK as well as a few days in Orlando for the Project Lead the Way Summit for pi-top.

In this post, I’m going to focus on PyCon, but please be prepared for it to be a fairly long one as I had a lot of adventures as part of my trip to Cardiff.

This is the fourth time I’ve attended PyCon as an educator and I can’t get over how much it has gone from strength to strength in that time. This year, as well as a children’s day and teacher’s track, there was a full two-day Picademy running at the start of the conference along with a wealth of education-focused talks (and a panel) from the likes of Tom Crick and Kushal Das.

I was lucky enough to be invited to Picademy as a facilitator again – it’s always an amazing experience to work with the Raspberry Pi Foundation team and this was no exception – in spite of their being two team members heavily pregnant, the energy and enthusiasm from everyone is always contagious and I absolutely love being part of the team.

This Picademy was no exception and all of the attendees seemed to really enjoy themselves as well as coming back to day 2 with smiles on their faces – there are loads of great photos in the PyConUK photo album by Mark Hawkins, but I’ve put some of my faves below. Please note, all photos within this blog post are from Mark’s album and so should be credited to him!

At the end of the first day of Picademy, we took all of the attendees for a meal at the Clink restaurant, which was a remarkable experience as all of the kitchen staff were inmates at HMP Cardiff. The concept of the Clink is to teach inmates genuine life skills so that they can reduce the reoffending rate for ex-prisoners and it seems that this amazing scheme is doing well, as they’ve seen a 41% reduction since it started. Not only that, but the food was absolutely incredible, so well done to all involved! The only downside was that no alcohol was served within the venue, but the food was so amazing that it didn’t really bother us! If you’re ever in Cardiff, or any of the other locations with a Clink, I would recommend booking a table as it was amazing and such a good cause.

After Picademy was over, I received a lovely message from one of the attendees, who wanted to thank us all for the experience of Picademy, Martin went on to explain that he had been suffering from anxiety and depression and had nearly not returned for day 2, but he was glad that he did. He really deserved his RCE badge and certificate and created an amazing project to detect whether someone had fallen over (useful after a night out). It was amazing to think that between us, we’d helped improve his outlook on life so much that he is already feeling more positive about the future. I’m so grateful that Martin took the time to let us know how he was feeling as it really brightened up our Friday night.

Saturday was the ‘kids day’ as well as the education track at PyConUK and I had offered to run a workshop in the Code Club room for younger coders. I was a bit nervous about running a workshop with breadboards, LEDs and Python for children as young as four, but it was an amazing success and the children were really creative with their junk modelling. Alas, I forgot to take any photos because we were having too much fun!

Also as part of the kids day, the lovely Josh Lowe ran an amazing workshop demonstrating using EduBlocks with Minecraft. I am really impressed with the latest iteration of EduBlocks, which 13-year-old Josh has created himself as a way of  bridging the gap between Scratch and Python – Josh is definitely one to watch and over the course of the weekend he managed to squeeze in a talk, a lightning talk, a workshop and a show and tell!

After the kids’ day finished, we invited the children up to the main conference stage to talk about their projects. I was really lucky to be asked to host this session and I was so impressed with all of the projects that the children produced. From the PyCon Flashing Python to a Micro:Bit Morse Code reader, the projects were amazing to behold and so well explained by all of the children. (Check out the rest of the kids’ lightning talk photos, starting here.)

On Saturday evening, I also hosted the adult lightning talks along with Vince Knight and it was great fun seeing a range of ideas, including Josh and another RPi fave, Martin O’Hanlon, talking about BlueDot, his simple Bluetooth controller for Raspberry Pi.

PYCON day three

It was great fun catching up with Martin and a few others like Dave Ames and Ben Nuttall – one of my favourite things about PyCon is catching up with old friends.

Sunday was my final day at the conference (I decided not to stay for the Code Sprints on the Monday). It was also my most emotional day overall – first off, Josh and I were presented with John Pinner Awards for service to the Python Community. John Pinner was the original founder of Pycon who sadly passed away a few years ago and so the organising committee decided to honour ten community members with an award in his name. I was pretty overwhelmed to have been one of the chosen few (the other 8 received their awards on Friday) and still can’t believe that I was nominated!

Not long after receiving my award, I did something that terrified me – I did a talk about Mental Health where I talked very openly about my personal struggle with depression. It’s been a tough journey to get to where I am today, but I’m confident enough to stand up and talk about my illness in a frank and honest way – I hope that it has opened a few people’s eyes to what it means to suffer from depression and anxiety and I look forward to getting a link to the official video, but in the meantime, Paul from Pimoroni live-streamed the talk in two parts which can be found here and here. Apologies for it being a bit rushed and emotional at times, but it felt good to get it all off my chest and thank you for all of the amazing comments and feedback. If I’ve helped one person or changed one person’s opinion on mental health, then I consider my talk a success so thank you for allowing me to stand up and talk about it. Link to my slides can be found here.

I guess that’s one of the amazing things about PyCon – they actively encourage talks about personal issues as well as including Django girls code days and TransCode days alongside the education days and kids’ days. AND they offer a free fully-staffed crèche to make the conference more accessible to parents, as well as offering bursaries to teachers and speakers to help make it more achievable to attend. It is perhaps the single most inclusive conference I have ever been to and that’s probably why people return year after year.

Finally, well done to everyone involved in organising PyConUK and here’s to next year being as amazing, if not better! Thank you to everyone I spoke to during the event as everyone was incredibly kind, supportive and friendly even before I laid myself bare in my talk. Good luck to those people who I spoke to after my talk who were struggling and felt brave enough to talk to me about it, and to those who maybe weren’t so brave and needed a hug too – it does get better, I promise. And… I only cried a little bit after my talk, and that was only because of how relieved I felt about how well received it had been.

 

 

Pimoroni Mood lamp

I bought the Pimoroni Mood Lamp kit way back in March at the Raspberry Pi Birthday Party, but I held off building it until Louise could come around, especially as I was nervous about soldering all of those pins onto the Pi Zero so I thought it would be a nice project for us to do together. You may remember that last year Louise and I built the CamJam 3 robot kit together; she is a talented artist and pub landlady with absolutely no background in computer science and no knowledge about how any of this stuff works, so she’s a great person to try things out with.

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So for those of you who aren’t familiar with the Pi Zero, it’s an even more tiny and cheap Raspberry Pi and it doesn’t come with GPIO pins already in place so you have to solder them on if you want to use them. Scary stuff for a novice solderer like me! In February, in time for the 5th birthday, Raspberry Pi announced the Pi Zero W which adds Bluetooth and WiFi to an already tiny and affordable device. The Mood Lamp was one of three kits that were released by Pimoroni at the launch of the Zero W. You can also get your hand on Pirate Radio, Scroll Bot and, as of a couple of weeks ago, the OctoCam – find them here.

So… on to the soldering. We started off watching the new soldering video which the Raspberry Pi Foundation brought out recently starring the lovely Laura Sach. I found Laura’s video to be really useful and interesting, but we also listened to the advice of soldering guru Stuart. As he pointed out to us, he’s been setting fire to carpets since he was 9 years old and so is experienced at soldering.

I had prepared for disaster and got a spare Pi Zero W and a hammer header in case the soldering went horribly wrong – thank you to both ModMyPi and Pimoroni for donating the spares (not that the former had much choice, they foolishly didn’t believe me when I said that the circumference of a pint glass was longer than it’s height and agreed to give me a Pi Zero W if I proved them wrong)… but I digress. The hammer header allows you to add pins to the Pi Zero W by tapping them in place using a hammer, so an excellent option as a back-up plan.

Stuart decided to solder five pins to start us off and hold it in place and then left us to it. He explained that it was important to make sure that we were heating the pin and the Zero and applying the solder to that and not the soldering iron. We had a go at a few pins, but Stuart wasn’t happy and told me to make sure I wasn’t just dabbing solder on the iron and letting in roll down. By the time the pair of us finished, we were pretty happy, but Stuart took a careful look and said that some of our joins didn’t have enough solder and so weren’t properly connected… and to think I was worried that I’d put too much solder on some of them. All told, we were there for around fifteen minutes, but it felt like much longer.

We were pretty pleased with ourselves when we’d finished so we sat down and got the kit out to try and figure out all of the parts… We had a bit of fun peeling off the plastic from the acrylic and laid all the bits out, but then we realised that we had still more soldering to do – the Unicorn Phat needed soldering too!!

Back to the kitchen we went, Louise decided to leave me to it and apparently I hit my soldering mojo and got the entire header soldered in a few minutes!

So, all soldered up, we were ready to go – I was quite interested to see the difference between the soldering on the zero compared to on the Unicorn Phat – I’d clearly improved by the second time!

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Louise was confused by the how the pieces went together, but we quickly found the tutorial and before we knew it, it was all built and looking pretty, including our soldered Pi Zero W and Unicorn Phat header.

Thank goodness for Stuart’s ridiculous amount of tools, as we were able to clip off the excess bolt length on the Pi Zero W mount.

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So, now we’d built our Mood Lamp, it was time to run the code – I put a Raspbian SD card into my pi-top, transferred the Unicorn pHat to test it. We followed the instructions on the Pimoroni GitHub for the Unicorn pHat to download and install the relevant library and examples. I figured random_sparkles.py was probably a good place to start, but when I ran it through Python 3, nothing happened. Stuart to the rescue… he opened Terminal and used the command

cd /home/pi/Pimoroni/unicornhat/examples

To access the directory and then used

sudo  ./random_sparkles.py

to get the code running – this frustrated me a little bit as I wouldn’t really have known to do that without his help. I know to run code through Idle, but I wouldn’t think to use Terminal and sudo without him telling me to – especially ./ which I’ve never seen before.

Next step was to get the code to run on start up – again I had a few problems with that, I followed this great guide from Les Pounder, but managed to accidentally leave the last line of the code as a comment with a # at the beginning – a little frustrating, but entirely my fault. We also discovered that again we need to use ‘sudo’ to get the code to run on start up, this time within the crontab settings (whatever that might mean).

So, we got the random sparkles up and running on start up and decided to transfer the SD card and Unicorn pHat into the Pi Zero W and get the mood lamp up and running. Unfortunately, we had no luck and I began to worry that I’d soldered everything wrong. Stuart sat and used VNC to check the pi was working and as far as we could see, everything was running as it should, but no random sparkles. Stuart decided to pull the Pi Zero out completely to check nothing had come loose and this point he threw his hands in disgust and gave it to me… it seems when I’d put the pHat back on the Pi, I’d not mounted it in the right place, it was just on the front row of pins and not on all 40 pins! What a wally!

I have to admit to finding this a little more stressful than I’d hoped, especially with the whole ‘sudo’ thing, and I have absolutely no idea where to start with connecting it to Twitter, but I’m glad I’ve got it built and it does look kind of cool. I think I’d like to use one of the other samples as the random_sparkles was a bit too quick for my liking, but that means going back into Crontab and putting all the bits back into the pi-top and I’m not sure I have the energy for that right now!

So, it’s an easy to put together kit, I just don’t feel like I’m quite confident enough with running code on start up or what to do when things don’t work first time!

At least Louise and I can both say that we know how to solder now, anyway!

An Easter gift – RPi beginner’s worksheet

[edit] As of June 2017, there is a version of Scratch 2.0 on Raspbian which makes this worksheet obsolete [/edit]

I’ve been running a few workshops for Crossover Solutions and have created some Raspberry Pi Physical Computing resources that seem to go down well with both children and adults and so, as a little Easter gift to you all, I’ve decided to share the worksheets.

There are four in total – ‘Your First Circuit’ ‘Scratch’ ‘Python’  and ‘Next Steps’, all designed to be an introduction to physical computing. My experience has been that pupils will get three LEDs blinking in Python within an hour – I’m sure you could do it quicker, but it’s really important to discuss with the pupils what they’re doing at each stage and why so I tend to take my time to ensure that conversation happens, particularly since this can be used as a transition from Scratch to Python as well as an introduction to electronics.

As always, huge thanks to the Raspberry Pi Foundation for the inspiration to produce resources like this, as well as their never ending support.

Get in touch if you’d prefer an editable version and I will send it over to you, otherwise click on the link below for a pdf.Screen Shot 2017-04-16 at 11.22.24.png

link: Workshop – crossover

Creative Commons Licence
Crossover Workshop by Cat Lamin is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Trying out the Micro:bit

It’s taken me far too long, but I’ve finally got my hands on a Micro:bit! I often get asked about these little micro-controllers and whether they are useful to have in the classroom so I’m looking forward to testing them out. Thank you very much to Nic Hughes for the loan!

The first thing to say about the Micro:bit is that unlike a Raspberry Pi, it’s not a computer; it’s a micro-controller like an Arduino, which needs to be plugged into a computer to have code uploaded to it. In contrast, a Raspberry Pi is a computer which does not need to be connected to anything else to work. This means that the Micro:bit is slightly more limited than a Pi, but it’s still a cool device.

So, let’s take a look at the physical hardware. The Micro:bit has a number of exciting features, not least of which are a host of components, which are clearly labelled on the back of the device – in particular, a compass, accelerometer and BLE antenna. I really like how clearly everything is labelled on the back for the device, this can be a great teaching point – what do we think each of those things do? How can we integrate them into our code?

The front of the device has 25 red LEDs in a 5×5 array. There are also two programmable buttons, 3 hardware pins, a 3V pin and a ground pin which can be used for add ons like NeoPixels or a growing range of Micro:bit boards designed to fit onto the Micro:bit like HATs on a Raspberry Pi.

In order to use the Micro:bit, you’ll need to head to the Micro:bit website. I suspect that there is an offline version of the various code editors, but for now I’ll work on the assumption that I need to work online. I know you can download Mu (pronounced moo because the creators liked the idea of ‘teachers saying moo in class’), which is a micro-python code editor for the Micro:bit, but I’m not sure about the other code editors.

Given my primary background, I will focus on block-based coding for now, but I can always follow up with a look at micro-python in a few days.

I love that there seems to be a wealth of activities on the website, including a special ‘Mother’s Day Challenge’ (For Americans and other non-UK people, Mother’s day in the UK falls in the middle of lent, which is usually in March, rather than mid-May).

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For now, I’m going to be looking at the ‘Let’s Code’ section of the website.

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When I first looked at the site a few weeks ago, the JavaScript Blocks editor was still in Beta, but Nic was very firm that we should be using it over the previous blocks editor made by Microsoft. I’ve also seen a tweet today showing that python-blocks is in development, although still only in Alpha at the moment. I can’t wait to see what it looks like!

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It’s worth taking a look at the projects page for some ideas about where to start with the Micro:bit and there are a few teachers coming up with schemes of work that use it (I suggest getting in touch with Spencer Organ who has written an entire scheme of work around Harry Potter).

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Since I’ve had so much fun making animated pets on the Pi lately, I figured an obvious start point for me would be to do something similar on the Micro:bit. Interestingly, when I went into the code window, it had remembered the piece of work I did several weeks ago when Nic first showed me the Micro:bit, which saved me having to hunt around and figure out the code!

So here’s how the screen looks – it has a nice familiar feel to it since it’s based on Blockly and is therefore very much like Scratch. The blocks are nicely colour coded depending on what you want them to do. I’m particularly curious about the ‘radio’ and ‘music’ options – I think you can allow Micro:bits to talk to each other, but I could be wrong – definitely something I’d like to investigate further.

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Here’s a closer look at the code I’ve written – the ‘pet’ was a little harder to draw on 25 pixels so it looks a bit weird.

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One frustrating thing about the Micro:bit is that you need to download the code and then manually drag and drop it into the Micro:bit although I’m told on a PC you can set the download location directly to the Micro:bit, still it’s a bit of a faff.

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A really cool feature of the Micro:bit website is that you can test your code on the website – in the video below you can see that you can test the ‘shake’ feature both by clicking on the shake button or by manually ‘wiggling’ the device. I think it’s really important that we remind children to check their code regularly as it can be really hard to find an error in your code if you’ve written loads and not checked it.

In the second video, you can see the code running on the actual Micro:bit.

There seem to be lots of input options to use instead of ‘on shake’ and I’d be interested in giving them a go, although I’m not sure what they mean. There are also other options to drag in. Take a look below:

Another nice little feature of the blocks editor is that you can view your code in JavaScript. I look forward to this being possible for Python too, which looks like it’s in development based on Nicholas’ tweet mentioned above.

There are a few ‘advanced’ options I’d be keen to explore, as well as the ability to add in packages for add ons which seems intriguing. Hopefully I’ll have a chance to explore some more features soon.

So, what do I actually think about the Micro:bit?

I’m actually more impressed than I thought I would be, I was expecting to be underwhelmed and instead I had great fun playing with the Micro:bit. The website is fairly easy to use and has some lovely features. I look forward to seeing it develop further. I know there are teachers crying out for schemes of work relating to Micro:bit so perhaps that’s something that needs developing further and in my brief hunt around the site I didn’t see any obvious explanation of some of those features in the code editor, but I admit I wasn’t looking too hard.

If I had my way, I’d like to see teachers using Micro:bit with a Raspberry Pi to really emphasise the technology and make clear how unique and exciting digital making can be – check out this resource on using the Micro:bit with Pi. However, if you forced me to choose between Micro:bit and Pi, Pi would win every time, it’s just more versatile and has more opportunity to develop your skills.

Micro:bit is a great place to start on a journey towards digital making and at £12.50 (or £15 if you want a battery pack with it), it’s fairly affordable, but it is simply a start point and you can achieve so much more with Arduino and Pi – for schools it is a good way to introduce text-based languages and I am particularly looking forward to the new block-Python that is being developed. In the long term, however, I know what I’d rather see being used.

 

 

Upcoming Talks and Events

I’m very excited to be taking part in some events coming up where I will speaking and running workshops etc.

First up is Coding Evening in Twickenham next week – the lovely Stokes and Moncreiff pub are hosting yet another Coding Evening for us on Thursday 19th May in their upstairs function room. The folks from Pi Top are hoping to pop over and we’ll have lots of cool ideas to help teach computing so come along to find out and get some inspiration for teaching computing whether you’re a complete novice or an experienced programmer!

Next up is the annual CAS conference in Birmingham on Saturday 18th June, I’m going to be running a workshop to show teachers how to use Scratch GPIO on the Raspberry Pi – the conference is looking to be a fantastic event with loads of exciting talks and workshops running.

On Sunday 26th June, along with Albert Hickey of Egham Jam, I’m helping to launch Wimbledon Raspberry Jam – we’re aiming to make the event as family friendly as possible, with talks about Primary Coding from me, Astro Pi from Richard Hayler and various others, including a very special talk from 10 year old Izzy, who is going to share why she finds coding so interesting and exciting. We’re also going to be running Minecraft workshops and Scratch workshops to show off some cool physical computing ideas.

On Saturday 23rd July (two days before my birthday), I’ll be travelling down to my home county of Cornwall to launch the first Truro Raspberry Jam at the Truro campus of Truro and Penwith College. We will also be hoping to run talks, workshops and show & tell tables – I’m really excited as the Cornish tech community are eager to share their excellent work. The Truro Jam is being launched in collaboration with Cornwall Tech Jam, Software Cornwall, Truro and Penwith College and various other groups!

Pycon UK is moving venue this year and will be held in Cardiff City Hall from Thursday 15th to Monday 19th September and I’m hoping to be there helping out with the Education Track on Friday again. The previous two years have been incredibly good fun and great for networking and getting ideas for teaching Python in schools.

In early November, I will hopefully be helping out at Mozfest and there are various other events coming up that I hope to be involved with too so keep an eye out for announcements on twitter about other events where you can find me talking and helping out.

There are also several upcoming events that I wish I could be a part of, but am unavailable due to various other commitments so I want to mention them and urge you all to go along if you can!

First up, Grace Owolade and her son Femi are hosting their third autism and tourettes friendly Raspberry Jam in South London on Saturday 14th May. Unfortunately I volunteered an afternoon of robot building to a charity auction and so am fulfilling my promise on Saturday so I can’t go, but I really hope to be able to support Grace and Femi more in the future as I think what they are doing is so important!

On Friday 17th June, the education team at Roehampton University is hosting a Festival of Computing with lots of great workshops and talks – it should be a great day! I was lucky enough to be invited to talk, but it’s on a school day so I can’t attend!

Finally, on 11th June, the amazing Carrie Anne Philbin is hosting a CAS #include Diversity & Inclusion in Computing Education Conference in Manchester. I really wish I could attend this event as I’m sure it will be super, but I’m fulfilling yet another aucition promise and taking some children for a picnic in the park. Make sure you go if you can!

So, lots to look forward to in the coming months! Very excited and hope to see some of you at some of the upcoming events.

 

 

 

 

 

Coding Evening Part 2

Just a quick post…

I’ve met with so many lovely people in the last few weeks and I’ve mentioned my coding evening to them so I thought it was worth writing a quick post to make the event page easy to find. I also want the opportunity to explain a little about how I want the evening to run.

So, way back at the end of January, I hosted my first coding evening, with the goal of getting teachers, Code Club volunteers and Raspberry Pi enthusiasts into one room just to see how everyone is getting on.

It turned out to be a lovely evening with lots of great chat about ideas for teaching the new computing curriculum and lots of enthusiasm to repeat the event.

For next Friday I’ve once again booked the lovely function room of the Stokes and Moncreiff pub in Twickenham. I hope to have three Raspberry Pis set up for people to try out or demonstrate on. I also plan to bring loads of resources and print outs from Code Club, Code Kingdoms etc. There’s an added bonus of the pub downstairs serving beer, wine, spirits (and soft drinks) as well as pleasant food which they will deliver to the function room. There will be Code Club volunteers, technicians, Raspberry Pi fans and an iPad specialist on hand to answer your questions. It would be lovely if people are willing to stand up and talk for two minutes on a subject of their chosing, but I’m certainly not going to enforce this.

So, if you’re still interested in coming, click the link below, sign up (it’s free) and we’ll see you there for a burger, beer and a great conversation about the computing curriculum:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/twickenham-coding-meetup-part-2-registration-15481779419