A busy few months

I know you guys love hearing about what I’m up to so here are a few fantastic events that I’ll be appearing it either running workshops or giving talks – it’d be great if you could come along and join in the fun!

Firstly, this weekend I’m taking the pi-top Champions to The National Museum of Computing and Bletchley Park museum for a weekend of training and fun – the most exciting thing about it is that on Sunday 19th the Champions will be running workshops in the National Museum of Computing, showing off exactly why we chose them – I’m so excited about this weekend and hope some of you can join and bring your kids along to what will be an incredible day of opportunities. Let us know you’re coming by signing up here!

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I’m really excited about the Champions day as I feel like we’re bringing together some of the best of the best when it comes to running workshops, training and all things Raspberry Pi – we’ve picked an amazing team of people for our Champions and I can’t wait to share further details with you all!

I’m looking forward to joining Nic Hughes at the London CAS conference on Saturday 25th February. Nic and I are working together with him leading a Crumble workshop and me leading a Physical Computing Raspberry Pi workshop. It’s always good fun working with Nic and we’re looking forward to inspiring some teachers to innovate their computer science classrooms.

Raspberry Pi is celebrating it’s 5th year at the Junction in Cambridge on 4th and 5th of March and I’ll be there both days and doing a talk on the importance of teaching children to code on Saturday 4th at 1.30. The birthday party is always a great fun community event and tickets can be bought here.

Throughout March and April, I’m running workshops through pi-top for a number of great charitable groups such as STEMSussex, BECSLink and London CLC which will be great fun and I’m hoping to be able to do something for International Women’s Day on 8th March.

</edit> I forgot to mention my own event – Coding Evening for Teachers, in Twickenham on Friday 24th March – tickets are here.</edit>

At the end of March, I’m VERY excited to be attending three incredible events – first up, the NAACE conference in Leicester (28th-29th March), where I’m running not one, but TWO break out sessions – one for pi-top and one talking about the amazing Active Lit as a tool for writing text adventures. Looking at the speaker list, I have a feeling this is going to be a very exciting event and it seems that the people at NAACE are really determined to make it a very successful couple of days.

Next up is PiWars in Cambridge – I’ve always been a big fan of Mike Horne and Tim Richardson, especially their really helpful CamJam EduKits for teaching physical computing with Raspberry Pi so I was incredibly honoured to be asked by them to be a judge at PiWars, an event so popular it’s had to extend to cover two days instead of just one! The blurb for the event describes it as:

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Pi Wars is a challenge-based robotics competition in which Raspberry Pi-controlled robots are created by teams and then compete in various non-destructive challenges to earn points. There are prizes awarded at the end of the day. Last year, we had teams from schools, families and groups of hobbyists and 30 of these teams competed for a full day of robot fun and games! Pi Wars takes place in Cambridge, UK and is open to anyone from around the world. It is run by the same team that organises the Cambridge Raspberry Jam.

How much fun does that sound? There are still spectator tickets available if you want to bring your children or even your class up to inspire them to create their own robots and one of the two days is dedicated entirely to schools and youth groups!

Following on the heels of PiWars is ATI 2017 in Malvern. Primarily an Apple event, this year ATI has extended to include some more general computer science skills, particularly Raspberry Pi and the lovely Joe Moretti asked me to suggest some workshops. I feel like a bit of an interloper seeing my name surrounded by some of the big names in Apple Education, but I’m really excited about offering some Physical computing and Minecraft hacking information for some teachers, most of whom will be completely new to Raspberry Pi and then entire Pi ecosystem. ATI looks like n exciting event and I know that the other presenters are all incredibly inspiring so I’m really glad to be part of the team – there are still tickets available and it’s worth going along just to meet people like Joe, Mark Anderson, Catherine Jessey and Jon Neale, all of whom I’ve seen present before and know are incredibly inspiring!

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Photo credit – Mark Anderson @ICTEvangelist/ATI event page

You’d think that’d be enough events, but no… in May, I’ve been invited by the STEM Centre in York to run a ‘Scratch Roadshow‘ taking sessions to Truro, Bristol, Swindon and Reading. This will be an intro to Scratch for primary school teachers who want to build their confidence a little – the best thing about it is that there is a bursary which makes the training completely free so it’s well worth letting your local primary school know if you think they could do with a boost!

Anyway, there are more events later in the year, but that will do for now! I hope you can come along to some of these events and please do come over and say hi – I love meeting you all ‘IRL’. And remember – if you can’t come to any of these events but are still interested in the type of training I can do, please drop me an email cat@crossover.solutions – I offer workshops and CPD training bespoke to your school or group’s needs!

 

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Shakey Sense Hat Cat

After Sunday’s coding session, I set the boys the task of making our Scratch Sense Hat Cat Shake, just like Carrie Anne’s Interactive Pixel Pet.

The first thing the boys did was to figure out how to use some of the sensors on the SenseHat – remember how in my other post, I said it was good practice to run the basic broadcast command before you do anything.

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We had found some code from Albert’s GitHub page, however, when we tried to select the sensor value for accelerometer, we only had a few choices as shown below.

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Luckily, after trying a few things, I suggested that we hit the green flag to check that the GPIO pins were on and that Scratch knew we had a SenseHat attached. When we next checked the sensing options a while heap of new options appeared, including the accelerometer (sorry, I forgot to screenshot it).

The boys had great fun playing with the sensors, but couldn’t quite figure out how to get the ‘shake’ function working so they went back to the original code for Interactive Pixel Pet.

x, y, z = sense.get_accelerometer_raw().values()

while x<2 and y<2 and z<2:      
    x, y, z = sense.get_accelerometer_raw().values()

This is what they come up with:

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A job well done, if I do say so!

Now, I’m sure some of you have spotted that I could neaten up my code by removing the ‘ledbackground’ line and that ‘clearleds’ would be better suited to the end of the repeat loop as that would leave me with a completely blank neopixel array at the end of the animation sequence, but otherwise I’m pleased with our work in recreating the pixel pet for Scratch.

I look forward to trying out some of the other sensors using Scratch in the future!

 

Sense Hat Cat using Scratch

So, I absolutely LOVE the Interactive Pixel Pet activity from the Raspberry Pi website, and while I was playing with the Sense Hat the other day, I realised it was possible to imitate it using Scratch. So far I’ve only got it running as an animation, so next step is to get the shake function working as we’ve just figured out how easy it is to use the other sensors on the hat using Scratch.

I had a play and managed to get a very cool dancing cat on my LED matrix – I’m not going to lie, I was super excited and may have run around showing everyone in a slightly excited manner. Fortunately, my colleagues were also excited, although their contributions of dancing ‘poo emojis’ weren’t quite what I had in mind.

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Here’s a bit of background on the Sense Hat… for those of you who don’t already know, the Sense Hat was created by the Raspberry Pi Foundation and launched as Astro Pi – a competition to get your pupils’ code into space. It has an 8×8 neopixel array, a mini joystick and a load of amazing sensors like humidity, pressure, gyroscope and accelerometer.

So, the first thing you always need to remember when using Scratch GPIO is that you have to turn on the GPIO server on and, if you’re using a hat, you’ll need to let it know which hat it is by using the command “set AddOn to”.

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This is pretty important for anything using the SenseHat and it’s good practice to run it before you go any further in your code as by running it, Scratch will realise you have access to all of the sensors on the hat and allow you to access them through the drop down menu in the blue ‘sensor value’ block.

Firstly you will need to delete the Scratch Cat so that you can draw you own sprite.

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In the paint editor, you need to zoom right in as far as you can and select the smallest brush size.

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You have four squares in total to draw your image – I’ve shown this here by making the area black (you don’t need to do this, but it can help as ‘black’ represents the neopixel being turned off).

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Now you can draw your image – you have exactly 64 pixels to draw with and, as you may have guessed, one pixel on the screen represents one neopixel on the sense hat. By the way, a neopixel is a very bright LED which can be any colour depending on the mix of red green and blue. The lighter your colour, the brighter it will appear on your neopixels so try to avoid dark browns and blues etc.

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Next you need to create a second image – you need to use the duplicate command to create a second version of your image.

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Then click on the costumes tab to be able to edit it a little bit so that you can make your second sprite slightly different, thus giving the appearance of animation.

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Finally, you need some simple Scratch code to get your image moving – I’ve put a couple of broadcast commands in here to clear the SenseHat before you start and to make sure that the background is black (so turned off).

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You can experiment if you want by changing the background colour, although this will only make a difference if your sprite is ‘backgroundless’ (but you have to make sure it’s still only 8 pixels/2 squares wide).

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I’ve had great fun recreating this project in Scratch and I’ve set Stuart and Kirk on a mission to figure out the ‘shake’ control too so hopefully I can add an update soon.

<edit> Kirk and Stuart have successfully managed to get shake working and are now celebrating with chocolate cake

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Part two of this project can be found here.

All thanks to Albert Hickey for his advice with this project – he is a Scratch and SenseHat guru!!

Watch this space for some more projects using Scratch soon!

Etcher -the BEST tool ever for burning OS to SD cards

A couple of years ago, I wrote a post about burning SD cards on a mac… but I’m not gonna lie, I found it quite difficult to do. You can imagine my delight, when someone at work suggested I try Etcher near the end of last year. What a fantastic app for making burning SDcards easy!

Just a reminder – when you’re using a Raspberry Pi, you need to install an operating system on your microSD card. Most Pi users install Raspbian, however, I’ve been using pi-topOS a lot for work. Installing an OS usually requires wiping the SD card manually then using clumsy software or even accessing the command line to install the new OS. Whereas with Etcher, you get clear feedback on process in a very easy, visual way.

Etcher is available for Windows, Mac and Linux, it is free to download and easy to install.

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On my old MBA I had a lovely SD card slot so it was REALLY simple for me to use – literally I downloaded the latest version of Raspbian or pi-topOS, put the SD card in, select the downloaded file (no need to extract the file, just use it as is), select the SD card and Flash!

Check out this gif from the Etcher website – it really is that simple!

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So… one peril I found was in my own stupidity.. I nearly flashed my USB stick instead of the SD card, only noticing at the last minute that the drive I’d selected was too big to be an 8GB SD card…

I’m sure you can turn it off, but Etcher automatically verifies the SD cards its burning, which does double the time it takes the burn an image. However, I found it used very little processor power and I quite often had SD cards burning in the background while I got on with my other work, which meant that by the end of the day I’d burnt a fair few SD cards to be workshop ready (I’m OCD, I like things to be prepared).

Seriously, I can’t fault Etcher, it has a fantastic interface, it’s easy to use, you don’t need to pre-wipe the SD cards, you just pop them in a burn away – so, so easy!

Good luck and enjoy!! Now… how do I burn SD cards on my new MBP??